Best of the Bunch: Finland

Finland has had a long history at Eurovision, with no less than 50 appearances at the contest. Their debut was back in 1961, and since then, they have performed in the final 44 times in total. Their best result was in 2006, where they won the contest with rock band Lordi, however on the flip side, they have come last 10 times. Today we start our journey in 2006, and finish up in 2015, looking at the last 10 entries from Finland to decide which song is the Best of the Bunch! Recap, and vote below!

We start off on Finland’s highest note in 2006, where Lordi represented the nation with the song Hard Rock Hallelujah. It was something new and novelty for Eurovision, with the band dressed in some of the most elaborate costumes in Eurovision history (although these are just their regular costumes!) and despite the shock factor, it still managed to triumph above all others and finally bring Finland their first Eurovision win!

With Finland as the host in 2007, the nation sent another rock number, this time sung by Hanna Pakarinen. The rock chick performed the song Leave Me Alone, and because Finland was the host country, they were automatically qualified for the final, and ultimately ended up in 17th with 53 points.

In 2008, Finland continued with the rock theme, this time with the band Teräsbetoni, who unlike Lordi, didn’t feature costumes as elaborate. The song was called Missä Miehet Ratsastaa, and was the first song completely in Finnish since 1998. The song qualified at 8th position in the semi-final, then in the final ended up in 22nd position with 35 points.

The following year, Finland sent Waldo’s People with the song Lose Control. It was a change from the last three years of rock entries, with the song definitely appealing more to the pop lovers. The song actually ended up in 12th spot in the semi-final, however was the juries pick, which could overrule the televote. In this case, Waldo’s People got a lifeline and got to perform again in the final, however ended up in last place in the final with 22 points.

In 2010, Finland hoped to build on their result from the previous year with the duo of Kuunkuiskaajat singing the Finnish language song, Työlki ellää. Despite a unique performance, the song just missed out on the final, ending up in 11th spot in the semi-final with a total of 49 points.

The next year, the northern nation sent the young Paradise Oskar with the cutesy song Da Da Dam. The song brought Finland success again, with the song actually placing 3rd in the semi-final, meaning it would be performed again in the final. On the night, however, the song ended up in 21st spot with 57 points.

In 2012, Finland sent a Swedish language song called När jag blunder, the first time since 1990 where a song in Swedish was sent by Finland. The performance just missed out on the finals, ending up in 12th spot in the semi-final.

In 2013, Krista Siegfrids scored the most votes in the national final, and would therefore represent Finland with the song Marry Me. As the name suggests, it was a very energetic performance, wedding dresses and all. The song was 9th into the final, and then on the big night ended up in 24th spot with 13 points.

The following year, Finland returned to rock music, this time, with a young band called Softengine. The band performed the song Something Better at Eurovision, with a fantastic light show on stage. They qualified to the final in 3rd position, and in the final, just missed out on hitting the top 10, finishing in 11th with 72 points.

Last up is Pertti Kurikan Nimipäivät, who were a controversial pick in the national final. Their song, Aina mun pitää lasted a miniscule 1 minute and 27 seconds (although some argued that even this was too long). Europe tended to agree, with the band ending up in last place in the semi-final with only 13 points.

That brings us to the end of our journey today! Which Finnish song is your favourite? Make sure to vote for your favourite, or favourites down below!

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