Junior Best of the Bunch: Serbia

Serbia first performed at Junior Eurovision as an independent nation back in 2006, and continued to participate until 2011, where the nation decided to withdraw. A few years later, Serbia’s broadcaster decided to return to the contest, and have since participated each year. Throughout their participation, Serbia have achieved varied results, with their best result being 3rd place, which they have achieved twice now, in 2007 and 2010. Like our Eurovision Best of the Bunch posts, we’re going to go back in time to recap on all the Junior Eurovision entries, and then it will be up to you to decide which entry is the Best of the Bunch!

Today we’re starting at Serbia’s debut entry as an independent nation, and their debut act was performed by the group Neustrašivi učitelji stranih jezika, with the song Učimo strane jezike. It was a 90’s style performance which featured around the theme of learning languages. The song featured phrases in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Russian and Japanese and of course Serbian! The song finished in 5th place with 81 points.

The following year, Serbia sent a talented young artist who Eurovision fans will likely recognise. The chosen participant was Nevena Božović, who ended up becoming the first Junior Eurovision participant to take part in the ‘adult’ contest as part of the group Moje 3, who performed at Eurovision 2013. Rewind back to her junior performance, and the song was called Piši mi, which ended up in 3rd place with 120 points!

In 2008, the nation sent Maja Mazić as their representative with the song Uvek kad u nebo pogledam. The song starts more as a ballad, but in true Eurovision style, changes to an upbeat pop number with a bit of an 80’s vibe. Maja is backed up on stage by a number of backing dancers dressed in yellow and blue, which brightens the performance. The song finished in 12th place with 37 points.

The next year, Serbia sent the upbeat song called Onaj Pravi, which was performed by Ništa lično. The performance took inspiration from the rock genre, featuring guitarists and a keyboardist on stage to accompany the lead artist who gets the crowd cheering with the catchy chorus. The song finished in 10th place with 34 points in total.

In 2010, the girl power continued, with Serbia sending Sonja Škorić as their Junior Eurovision representative with the song Čarobna noć. It was a big ballad performed by a big voice, and the kids of Europe really responded to that combination, as it became Serbia’s best result, equal with Nevena back in 2007. It finished in 3rd place with 113 points.

Serbia then took a break from Junior Eurovision between 2011 and 2013.

Serbia returned in 2014 with the song Svet u mojim očima, which saw the performer Emilija Đonin take to the stage with her piano to play the sensitive ballad. The song had a beautiful melody, and was confidently performed by Emilija. The song just scraped into the top 10, finishing in 10th place with 61 points.

In 2015, the young but talented performer Lena Stamenković took to the stage with another beautiful ballad titled Lenina Pesma. Although small, Lena had a big personality which filled the stage, along with her big voice. Each big note impresses us, especially towards the end of the song where she nails each big note. The song received 79 points, which left the song in 7th place.

The last entry we’ll be looking at today is the 2016 entry, which was called U La La La, performed by Dunja Jeličić. It was one of our favourites leading up to the contest, as the song was incredible catchy, and Dunja was a very hip young artist. We were very shocked when the song finished in last place with only 14 points! Definitely underrated!

We can’t wait to see who Serbia select for the upcoming Junior Eurovision, but for now, it’s up to you to decide which of these Serbian Junior Eurovision entries is your Best of the Bunch! Vote in the poll below:

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