Junior Best of the Bunch: Georgia

Georgia first made their Junior Eurovision debut back in 2007, the same year that they first took to the Eurovision stage. Since their debut, they have yet to miss a contest, and have proven to be a force within the contest with no less than 3 Junior Eurovision wins, and barely a time out of the Top 10. In 2017, Georgia will be hosting the contest after winning in 2016, but before we get ahead of ourselves, let’s journey back in time to recap all the Georgian entries, and then it will be up to you to vote for your Junior Best of the Bunch!

We’re starting today’s journey in 2007, where the debut act Mariam Romelasvili took to the stage confidently to sing her song Odelia Ranuni. It was an incredibly upbeat debut to the contest, with the melody of the song wonderfully catchy! It was a hit with audiences too, who voted Georgia into 4th place with 116 points.

The following year saw the trio Bzikebi represent Georgia with the song Bzz. This entry is perhaps one of the most iconic entries not only from Georgia, but of Junior Eurovision in general. If you couldn’t have guessed by the name of the song, the trio were busy bees, busy winning the contest! In their second year of participation, Georgia won with a total of 154 points.

In 2008, Georgia sent the group Princesses to the Junior Eurovision stage for one of the more “sedate” Georgian entries at the contest. The song was titled Lurji Prinveli, and featured plenty of opportunities to harmonise, which the girls nailed. It wasn’t a fairytale for the girls, who finished in 7th place with 68 points.

In the next year, Georgia channelled their wacky side once again with Mariam Kakhelishvili and her song Mari-Dari, which like their winning 2008 entry, was completely in an imaginary language.  It was a very intense song that seemed to divide audiences, but overall Georgia once again finished in 4th place with 109 points.

In 2011, Georgia sent the super sweet girl group called Candy with the song Candy Music. It was a song that wasn’t on our radar, but it turns out Europe has a sweet tooth, as Georgia won the contest for a second time! Candy Music scored a total of 108 points.

Georgia found what worked for them at Junior Eurovision, and have since capitalised on it. It’s the crazier entries that always succeed for Georgia, and their 2012 entry definitely demonstrated that. The group Funkids was chosen to represent the nation with Funky Lemonade which was certainly a catchy entry, catchy enough to send Georgia into 2nd place with 103 points!

In 2013, Georgia went back to their cute strategy for Junior Eurovision, sending the group The Smile Shop with the song Give Me Your Smile. It was a song that so innocent that you couldn’t help but smiling at, and it seemed that most of Europe was happy with the performance too, as they finished in 5th place with 91 points.

Lizi Pop was the chosen representative for 2014 with the song Happy Day. It became one of the most popular videos on the official Junior Eurovision YouTube channel, however it just didn’t hit the mark on the Junior Eurovision stage. The song finished in 11th place with 54 points, the one and only time Georgia has been out of the Top 10 to this date. Don’t fret, Lizi Pop will be returning as host for Junior Eurovision 2017!

2015 saw the return of the wacky Georgia with the group The Virus flying the Georgian flag at the contest with the song Gabede. It was an intense vocal performance, and a bit more rock oriented than previous pop entries that Georgia sent to Junior Eurovision. It didn’t excite audiences, as the song finished in 10th place with 51.

That leads us the 2016 entry, Mzeo, performed by the young but talented vocalist Mariam Mamadashvili. It was worlds away from their previous entries, and previous winning entries, but its charming Disney vibe sent Georgia to the top once again, finishing in 1st place with 239 points!

Now it’s time for you to vote for your Junior Best of the Bunch!

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